The Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service ** eBook Out Now **

The Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service, published by Pen and Sword Books, is available in hardback and as an e-book, including Amazon’s Kindle, Barnes and Noble’s Nook and Kobo. Continue reading “The Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service ** eBook Out Now **”

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The Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service ** eBook Out Now **

Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air ServiceThe Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service, published by Pen and Sword (Aviation), is now available as an e-book. In addition to the hardback edition the book is published in a wide variety of e-book formats, including Amazon’s Kindle, Barnes and Noble’s Nook and KoboClick here to buy your copy.

Through vivid accounts of the air and sea battles that raged across the Pacific the book provides an in-depth history of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service and illustrates how the United States re-established its military dominance following the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The book, which was originally published posthumously by the author’s son in 2011, has received many notable reviews from publications and organisations around the world, including the Fleet Air Arm Officers Association, which said; “An immensely detailed account of how the Imperial Japanese Government embraced the concept of Air Power and how they developed Naval Aviation from before World War One to the final defeat in 1945. This book is a triumph for Peter Edwards’ son Richard.” Continue reading “The Rise and Fall of the Japanese Imperial Naval Air Service ** eBook Out Now **”

When the Japanese Bombed Oregon

On 9 September 1942 the Japanese submarine aircraft carrier, I-25, surfaced quietly off the Oregon coast and at 0600 Warrant Flying Officer Nobuo Fujita took-off in a Glen floatplane on the only aerial bombing mission over the US mainland during the Second World War.

Fujita’s mission was to drop two 170lb incendiaries and start extensive forest fires in the Pacific Northwest near Brookings, Oregon. The Japanese had hoped that the mission would draw valuable US military resources away from the war in the Pacific, but heavy rain the night before had meant that the forest was still very damp and the US Forest Service were able to quickly extinguish the fires. Continue reading “When the Japanese Bombed Oregon”